problems

When to act and when to wait?

OK, maybe a bit too broad as a headline, but this at least partly covers an oft-seen scenario when part of the organisation want to jump straight into building a solution for a given problem, while another part of the organisation wants to dig deeper into the problem first. In my experience, using the questions below is a good starting point to see if you are actually ready to start working on a solution – and it can defuse any impression that people that want to do more analyses aren’t just “slow” or “timid”.

Presenting the different responses to the questions (e.g. the five radically different perceptions of what the basic problem is) can be a very powerful way to show senior management and/or stakeholders without detailed knowledge of the situation that there are more versions of the truth out there. However, it can of course also be used the other way, to show that everyone are aligned on the problems and the best way forward is actually to try to build a fix for the problem and get some feedback on the effectiveness from the people that need to use it.

  • Problems and (potential) solutions:
    • Do all key stakeholders agree what the basic problem is? (you might be surprised how often this is a resounding “No!”…)
    • Do all key stakeholders agree on the (initial) scoping and prioritisation of issues?
    • Do all key stakeholders agree on the desired business outcome?

 

  • Impact:
    • Can we define clear success criteria for a solution and objective ways to measure them?
    • Can we predict the knock-on effects of what we are changing (systems/processes/organisation)?
    • Can we predict how a solution impacts our current way of doing business?

 

  • If answers are mostly YES = consider building a “minimum viable product”-based pilot and trying it. Use the collected experience and feedback from all stakeholders to refine and improve the solution.
  • If answers are mostly NO = consider doing more analysis and alignment to better understand the problem and it’s context. This will ensure that you have a solid foundation for any solution and hopefully avoid taking too many detours and wrong turns on the path from problem to solution.