comparisons

On architects and doctors….

I want to make it clear that I have tremendous respect for doctors and I don’t think that a comparison is entirely justified – after all the decisions I’m called upon to make on a daily basis are hardly “life-and-death”. Also, rather than anything remotely dangerous or traumatising, typical occupational risks for someone like me are likely to be the mental anguish of too many meetings without a clear purpose and the physical impact of 8-12 hours per day in an office chair…

I will however maintain that this works as a comparison, a) because of quite a few similarities in patterns, and b) because the context in which the doctor operates is much more clear-cut than the world of SW architecture, making it more easily understandable to “normal” people in a business (whatever that means… :D) .

Examples of where I find this analogy useful as a means of communicating what I do to those around me:

– 1) Listening to requirements is to me somewhat akin to listening to a patient describing symptoms and carries the same inherent risk of jumping to conclusions about what the problem really is. The doctor has to cut through the patient’s own ideas of what the problem is, the patient’s preferred solutions to said problem and any “false flags” because people simply don’t necessarily realise what is important to tell the doctor.

– 2) Like the doctor, the architect also has to balance short-term inconvenience/discomfort with long-term benefits for the patient. That means sometimes causing a patient to go through very painful procedures because they will give the best end result. Good doctors recognise that while some decisions clearly should be made by the patient, some decisions should be made by an expert that has the full picture and a more objective position on what the right decision is. I doubt that anyone would leave all medical decisions to the patient, but some people seem very prepared to insist that all IT decisions are made by the business (or exclusively by IT, which IMHO is equally wrong).

– 3) The doctor has to keep the good of the patient front and center, but the doctor must also be prepared to make uncomfortable decisions for the good of the patient (cf. point 2), remain objective while doing so and then be able to stay (relatively) calm and composed when someone afterwards starts to second-guess the decision they made.

– 4) Last, but not least: Patients normally come to doctors because doctors are experts and they are prepared to accept an expert opinion but the doctor understands the responsibility of making decisions based on the relatively limited input that a patient can provide. I have seen some curious practices for instance regarding sign-off of requirements and solutions – which, if you transplant them to a doctor/patient context and it becomes clear that they do not make sense at all. Some of them, when transplanted into this alternative context, would effectively mean that you had to be a doctor yourself in order to get any value out of seeing a doctor…

 

…or am I completely off here?